Tag Archives: twitter

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Why Hashtags Matter – #SWvirtualpal

Twitter has been such a great tool for learning, sharing, and meeting new colleagues.  If you haven’t tried a twitter chat, there are some great social work chats being held on twitter.  One way to curate and organize your topics is through using hashtags.  Hashtags also can also help you find out whats happening in your professional community.

There’s one great hashtag that I want to promote, and I hope it catches on.  The hashtag #SWvirtualpal is a cool hashtag that helping social workers develop a community on twitter.  Laura Hitchcock helped develop this term and writes about it on her recent blog post.  Please read her post to learn  how to find your SWvirtualpal.  https://t.co/FVftFcK1Tx

swvirtualpal

Find me on twitter as @socialworkpad

 

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Popular Social Media Apps – What’s Hot and What’s Not -Don’t Get Fooled

During my daily read, I found a wonderful site that gives tons of information about keeping teens, parents, and professionals safe on-line.    One video that was extremely informative was the, “Popular App Guide for Parents and Teachers.”  It is worth looking at from beginning to end as it is eye-opening.

Off course you can find something unsafe about many social media apps.   The Safe Smart Social site attempts to  explain to those that aren’t so familiar with social media, the way social media apps can be positive, and how to look out for those innocent appearing apps, that can be used for negative behavior.  Below is the video from Safe Smart Social that is definitely worth sharing.

There is a lot of other great information on the Safe Smart Social site.  How will you use this information?  Are there other comments you could make about these apps.  Your comments and suggestions are greatly appreciated.

 

 

Five Tips for Taking Advantage of Twitter Over the Summer | Edutopia

Develop a personal learning network on twitter

Develop a personal learning network on twitter

In an earlier post, I wrote about how you can use technology to organize your professional material, share professional items, and connect to similar professionals.  Take a look at Twitter for developing your personal learning network.  You will be surprised how engaging, informative,thought-provoking, and current twitter can be.  Although the article linked below,  is written with teachers in mind, it can apply to the many clinicians that work in schools.  Follow these same tips by: joining a social work chat, follow connected social workers, re-tweet things that you find informative and interesting (keep your personal and professional twitter accounts separate) and don’t forget to have fun.   After reading the article take a look at my twitter page and follow me @socialworkpad

Five Tips for Taking Advantage of Twitter Over the Summer | Edutopia.

How social media assisted clinicians during the teachers strike in Chicago

CPS Strike

Teachers and clinicians strike together

I took time off from posting in August getting prepared to come back to work beginning September at my school.  As many know, the CTU decided to strike a week after school began.  The strike also included all clinicians (social workers, psychologist, nurses, speech pathologists, counselors, OT and PT) and they had committees developed to bargain for their rights.  Social media played a huge role in keeping everyone up to date on the negotiations and the daily strike  locations.  I tweeted about the strike from my address @socialworkpad, and our delegates emailed us daily.  The CTU developed a Facebook page devoted to keeping members informed of the changes in negotiations.  I can proudly say that I used my social media to make an impact.  When our delegates needed feedback on some of the language that would be written in the new contract, it was easy to give feedback via email and texting.  For the first time clinicians voices were heard and contract specifications were developed specifically for each job title.  This is a good example of how social media can make an impact and make changes for everyone involved.